Making the Most of LinkedIn: Daily Action Plan

linkedin daily checklist action planDo you have a good LinkedIn profile that includes a LinkedIn profile picture and all the important fields filled in? Before you start doing regular activities in LinkedIn, you want to make sure your profile is in tip top shape. To help you along, you might check out 10 great examples of CEO LinkedIn profiles.

LinkedIn profile all good now?

You know you can do a lot of things on LinkedIn. But your time is limited. To help you along, use this checklist as your Daily LinkedIn Action Plan. It’s OK if you can’t do it five days a week. Try to make it a habit to work through the list two or three days a week.

On some days, you won’t need to do a couple of these activities. Most don’t take more than a few minutes. Checking everything on this list on a weekly basis ensures you do a little bit of all the important things in LinkedIn: nurture leads, build relationships and stay top of mind.

+- Check Inbox messages.
+++++o Respond to inquiries.
+++++o Set reminders for follow-ups.
+- Do follow-ups.
+- Accept new connections.
+++++o Tag new connections.
+++++o Send personalized welcome message to new connections.
+- Check “Keep in Touch” in the Connections menu.
+++++o Wish happy birthday.
+++++o Congratulate on promotions, job changes and news.
+++++o Give them a reason to respond by asking a question or suggesting a meeting.
+- Follow up with people who accepted your connection requests.
+++++o Send a personalized welcome message.
+++++o Set reminders for follow-up.
+- Post a status update.
+++++o Share interesting articles.
+++++o Post a quote.
+++++o Provide a tip.
+- Check your notifications (see the flag icon at the upper right of the page).
+++++o Respond to comments on your blog posts, group posts and status updates.
+++++o Like or post a comment on a connection’s post.
+++++o Send connect requests to people who are engaging with your content.
+- Send connect requests to five to 10 people who fit your criteria.
+++++o Check your saved searches for connection ideas.
+++++o Run new searches to find new connections.
+++++o Review group discussions to find new connections.
+- Check one or two groups.
+++++o Look for discussions you can comment on.
+++++o Respond to questions you can answer.
+++++o Share content relevant to the group; formulate your title as a question.
+- Check your activity feed on home page for news and updates.
+++++o Like or comment on info shared by people you want to nurture.
+++++o Share anything interesting.
+- Look at tagged list in “Keep in Touch.”
+++++o Open profile page of someone you want to nurture.
+++++o Endorse him or her for one skill.

What do you think of the Daily LinkedIn Action Plan? What would you add or change?

Get more LinkedIn tips

How Do I Build Relationships on LinkedIn?

Building relationships on LinkedIn requires a different tact than with people you meet in person. You might attend a conference or a networking event. There, you work the room introducing yourself and learning about others. Before moving on, you exchange contact information and follow up.

With LinkedIn, you’re in a room with millions of other professionals. Who do you talk to? What do you say? Should you send a message? Start a conversation in a forum? It’s almost like trying to clean an overflowing garage. Where do you start?

First, know that there are no shortcuts or speedy ways to cultivate relationships in LinkedIn. The good news is that following this process will ensure you take a direct path to building relationships on LinkedIn.

Start with the reason why you’re on LinkedIn. What do you want to get out of it? Grow business? Find partners? Connect with investors? Invest in startups? In answering this, it’ll help you define your target audience.

And now you’re ready to start the process of building relationships in LinkedIn. Here’s the process:

linkedin nurture connections

 1. Search for new connections.

linkedin process search new connections

Begin searching LinkedIn Groups to find the people who meet your defined target audience. For example, if you want to connect with managed services providers (MSP), look for MSP-related groups to join. Be careful. If you’re not an MSP and the group is specifically for people who work for an MSP, it would probably be best not to contribute. Still, you can listen.

Look for groups with a decent amount of members and lots of activity. For every group, LinkedIn displays the group’s activity level. After joining a few groups, monitor the discussions while noting the names of people you may want to contact.

LinkedIn’s search tool gives you another way to find people. Its search tool allows you to save searches, search by keywords, company, location, job title and more. Read Advanced LinkedIn Search Tips and Tricks for more ideas on how to maximize your searches to find the right people.

2. Introduce

linkedin process connections introduce

LinkedIn Groups can open the door to an introduction. When a contact you’d like to meet posts something you found intriguing, send a message that references the post. Use it to introduce yourself with a request to connect.

For people you find by searching LinkedIn, where you don’t have a group in common, you’ll most likely need to look up their email address. (LinkedIn Premium Members can send InMail.) Check the person’s profile and contact info for clues on how to contact the person. Once you’re able to send a message, explain why you want to connect while including a benefit for the recipient. Your message should include:

  • Why you chose them
  • What you have to offer, or how you might be able to help
  • What you would like them to do

Do you and the prospect know someone in common? Ask your mutual friend to connect you. People tend to follow through when receiving referrals from people they know.

3. Build Credibility

linkedin process credibility trust connection

Yes, it’s harder to build trust online when you can’t look someone in the eye and shake hands. But you can show you’re reliable, likeable, and competent through your actions. An easy way to do this is with education.

You gain trust by sharing useful resources like case studies and articles, forwarding news, sending analyst reports, and letting people know you saw their company mentioned in an article. Every time you stay in touch on LinkedIn by providing valuable resources, it nudges up the trust meter.

Another way to build credibility is to make and follow through on promises. Most people fail to follow up or are generic about how they will follow up. A good promise is one that you know you can deliver, is under your control, and doesn’t rely on other people to make it happen.

A promise can occur in an email, phone call or tweet. When you make a promise, be specific about when you’ll follow up whether it’s tomorrow or by next Monday. Then, deliver on the promise.

Life happens. Sometimes you can’t keep a promise for whatever reason. Contact the person as soon as possible, apologize, and make another promise that you know you won’t miss.

If you have an email list, you can add new LinkedIn connections to the list. When people accept your LinkedIn connection request, it gives you permission to stay in touch with them. But you don’t want to abuse that. Yes, you can add them to your email list. But it’s better to ask them first if it would be OK, and explain why the emails would be useful to them. Respect them enough to give them the choice.

4. Nurture

linkedin process nurture connections

Nurturing is the process of building relationships with non-sales-ready leads to keep them your funnel. LinkedIn provides some tools to support relationship-building.

You may get notification emails from LinkedIn letting you know who’s celebrating a birthday, a work anniversary, new job and so on. If not, you can see this in your Connections section on LinkedIn, under Keep in Touch, where you’ll find all of your LinkedIn Contacts. Use those and these six excuses to stay in touch on LinkedIn.

Check your home page for news, articles, and content from your connections. Like, comment, and share their content. Little things like this build warm fuzzies.

Endorsements offer another quick way to do something for others. Visit a person’s LinkedIn profile and simply click the skill you wish to endorse. If someone endorses your skills, that’s another excuse to send a message of thanks and check in.

You can go further as a lead moves along in your sales funnel.

Eventually, when the lead moves from cold to warm, you’ll mention your product or service and explain why it’s the right one. Education works well with prospects in the awareness phase of the customer decision journey. It also helps overcome potential objections and teach them what they need to know.

You can invite serious prospects to webinars and events, a great way to demonstrate your expertise. Effective companies have a marketing strategy that identifies what content they share with the leads based on where they fall in the sales funnel. When your LinkedIn connections reach the next phase of the customer decision journey, be sure to include them in the activities for that phase.

At the right time, you can share video customer testimonials, podcasts, white papers and product demonstrations.

Remember that you can enter notes about connections in LinkedIn. No one else can see these notes. You can also use tags. When meet someone, you can tag that person with “Awareness” or whatever you call the first phase of the funnel. When someone moves from “Awareness” to “Consideration,” then you can drop the “Awareness” tag and replace it with “Consideration” or your name for the second phase. Do this for your connections to know where they are in your funnel.

Do consistent nurturing to keep your company in front of prospects. That way, when they need you, they’ll remember you.

5. Move offline.

linkedin process offline connections

You’ve reached the end of the line. Your prospect is sales-ready. Take the relationship to the next level by requesting a phone call or in person meeting. Before you connect offline, prepare to share what you have to offer that benefits the other person. It’s easier to create value when you focus on giving rather than receiving.

The most successful LinkedIn users stand out because they always offer value. There’s a reason why answering “What’s in it for me?” still works. Thank them for their time.

Don’t forget – keep nurturing the relationship even after you move it offline. Sharing warm fuzzies never gets old.

What other ways can you build relationships on LinkedIn?

Your 10-Step LinkedIn Daily Action Plan

linkedin daily checkHabits help us do the same thing every day without fail. Waking up, brushing teeth, showering, exercising and so on. It’d be worth adding LinkedIn to the list because it helps grow your business. I know – it’s just another thing you don’t have time for, right? Start small. Try it once a week, then twice until you reach a comfortable pace.

The results might surprise you that you’ll be compelled to do it four or five times a week. If once or twice a week works better, then you can do most of these for longer stretches. The only exception is birthday wishes as you’ll want to send those on the person’s birthday, or close to it.

Here’s your 10-step LinkedIn Daily Action Plan.

1. Check Inbox for messages.

- Respond to inquiries.
- Set reminders for follow-ups.

2. Do follow-ups.

- When someone tells you about a project or big event, follow-up to see how it went.
- After meeting someone at an event, send a resource or something of value.

3. Accept new connections.

- Tag the connections you’ve accepted. Suggestions:

  • Where you met the person. Event, company, party, trade show, social media, etc.
  • How did you meet? In-person, online, phone, etc.
  • Type of relationship: Customer, prospect, group member, coworker, vendor, friend, relative, fellow alumni and so on.
  • Strength of relationship on a scale from 1 to 5 with 1 being weakest and 5 is strongest.
  • What do you want to do with the person? Meet in person, build relationship, maintain relationship, grow relationship, reconnect, etc.
  • Location.
  • Industry.

- Send a personalized welcome message to new connections. (When you accept someone else’s connection and vice versa.) Suggestions:

  • Briefly describe what you do for clients.
  • Mention your email list, why it’s valuable and how to subscribe.
  • Send a link to download a free guide or resource of value.

4. Check Keep in Touch or daily email from LinkedIn Updates.

- Send birthday wishes.
- Congratulate on promotions, job changes and news. (Verify the dates because sometimes it looks new when it isn’t.)
- Traveling? Find contacts in the area where you’ll be to see if they want to meet.
- Share an interesting resource.

5. Post a status update on your home page. Suggestions:

- Interesting articles along with a short comment.
- Inspirational quote.
- Tip based on your expertise.
- Statistics.
- Powerful, professional images.

6. Check your notifications.

- Respond to comments on your blog posts, group posts and status updates.
- Send connect requests to people who engage with your content.

7. Send five to 10 connect requests to people who fit your criteria.

- Check your saved searches.
- Run new searches.

8. Check one or two groups.

- Comment on discussions.
- Answer questions.
- Share content relevant to the group and write a question to use as the title.

9. Check your activity feed.

- Review news.
- Read updates.
- Like or comment on info shared by people you want to nurture.
- Share anything interesting related to the update.

10. Filter a tagged list in Keep in Touch.

- Open the profile page of anyone you want to nurture to endorse them for one skill.
- Send a message.

Try it and let us know how it works for you. What suggestions do you have for this list?

Best 5 Blog Posts: Social Selling

social media sellingSocial media is far more than a distraction or even a networking tool. Your network may be one of the most valuable resources you have, and it’s time to dive into the realm of social selling (if you haven’t already!). Odds are you’ve been doing social selling for some time, even if you haven’t realized it. Harnessing social media to reach out, share your expertise, and touch your prospects is a phenomenal method of marketing and nurturing.

Here are our top 5 blog posts on social selling:

Social Selling: Step Up Your Game

Social Selling: 1 Big Idea to be 38x More Effective

A Foolproof Approach to Social Media Selling

Social Selling for Sales Leaders: How Social Selling Works

1 Hour a Day = Social Selling Success!

Best 5 Blog Posts: Traditional Sales Funnel vs. the Customer Decision Journey

sales funnel customer decision journey CDJ“Is the traditional sales funnel dead? Is it obselete? Is there even a structure to follow anymore?”

The old sales funnel may not be recognizable, but there’s still a framework for marketers and salespeople to use as a guide. It is important to understand that the thought process a potential customer goes through is no longer one directional and linear, but rather a web of potentiality.

To start off, here is a useful tool we’ve found:

The Customer Journey to Online Purchase

And here are our pick for top 5 posts on the subject:

You Can’t Own Your Customers’ Decision Journey, But You Can Try

The Dim Light at the End of the Funnel

The Sales Funnel is Dead

The Buyers’ Journey Demystified by Forrester

Social is Responsible for 57% of Your Sales Funnel

And finally, here is our take on it:

How Social Media Affects the Customer Decision Journey

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  • Why this Blog?

    I have been running a marketing and PR firm since 1994. I love marketing and I love helping people grow their businesses. This blog lets me share what I've learned about marketing to help you generate more leads and sales for your company.
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    Email: jschramm@proresource.com
    Phone: 1-703-824-8482
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